Your tax-filing checklist

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Do you have everything you need to file your taxes? This list covers some of the most common documents and information you may need to complete your income tax return.

Financial forms provided by Edward Jones

Form name Form description
Consolidated 1099 Tax Statement May include Forms 1099-B, 1099-DIV, 1099-INT, 1099-OID and 1099-MISC
Form 1099-R Distributions and other retirement account activity, including Roth conversions
Form 1099-Q Distributions from 529 savings accounts

Note: Edward Jones mails or electronically delivers all Forms 1099-R and 1099-Q by Jan. 31 and all Consolidated 1099 Tax Statements by Feb. 15, per IRS requirements.

Employment and Income data

Form name Form description
Form W-2 Employment Income
Form 1099-G Unemployment compensation and state tax refunds
Form 1099-MISC Miscellaneous income, including rent and royalties
Schedule K-1 Partnership, S corporation and trust income
Form 1099-R Pensions, annuities, IRAs and qualified plans
Form SSA-1099 or Form RRB-1099 Social Security benefits or railroad retirement benefits

Homeowner information

Form name Form description
Form 1098 Mortgage interest
Form 1099-S Sale of your home or other real estate
Tax receipts Showing real estate taxes paid

Other items of income, expense or deduction

  • Gifts to charity (both cash and noncash)
  • Child care expenses
  • Personal property tax receipts
  • Health Savings Account (HSA) contributions and distributions
  • Medical and dental expenses
  • Traditional IRA contributions
  • Deductible retirement plan contributions
  • Higher education fees: Form 1098-T
  • Margin interest expense
  • Investment expense records, including margin interest expense
  • Alimony received or paid
Important Information:

Not every item will apply to your situation. This checklist is only a guide and is not designed to be an exhaustive list of items that warrant consideration. Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors cannot provide tax or legal advice. You should consult your attorney or qualified tax advisor regarding your situation.